A selection of 18 vintage gelatin silver prints by Lyonel Feininger (1871–1956) and his two sons Andreas (1906–1999) and T. Lux (1910–2011).

Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

The Photojournalist, 1951

Gelatin silver print

10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)

Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

The Photojournalist, 1951

Gelatin silver print

10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)

Inquire

Lyonel Feininger (1871–1956)

(Steam Locomotive), c. 1928
Gelatin silver print
4 9/16 x 5 13/16 in. (11.6 x 14.8 cm)

Lyonel Feininger (1871–1956)

(Steam Locomotive), c. 1928
Gelatin silver print
4 9/16 x 5 13/16 in. (11.6 x 14.8 cm)

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

S.S. United States Sailing in New York Harbor, 1952

Gelatin silver print

7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (19.1 x 24.1 cm)

Signed verso: A. Feininger

Inscribed verso: F C-52/4 “United States”

Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

S.S. United States Sailing in New York Harbor, 1952

Gelatin silver print

7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (19.1 x 24.1 cm)

Signed verso: A. Feininger

Inscribed verso: F C-52/4 “United States”

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Images

T. Lux Feininger (1910-2011)
Lyonel Feininger Sketching at the Beach, c. 1932
Gelatin silver print
9 1/4 x 7 in. (23.5 x 17.8 cm)

 

NOT FOR SALE

Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

The Photojournalist, 1951

Gelatin silver print

10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3 cm)

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T. Lux Feininger (1910-2011)
Lyonel Feininger by the Sea, c. 1928
Gelatin silver print

3 x 3 7/8 in. (7.7 x 10 cm)

 

NOT FOR SALE

Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

World Trade Center, 1984

Gelatin silver print

13 3/4 x 11 in. (34.9 x 27.9 cm)

Signed and dated lower left verso: A. Feininger 1984
Inscribed verso: (C) 1984 by Andreas Feininger

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

S.S. United States Sailing in New York Harbor, 1952

Gelatin silver print

7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (19.1 x 24.1 cm)

Signed verso: A. Feininger

Inscribed verso: F C-52/4 “United States”

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

The Queen Elizabeth, New York, 1958
Gelatin silver print
9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (24.8 x 19.4 cm)

Signed verso: A. Feininger

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

(Wooden Locomotive, Carved and Handpainted by Lyonel Feininger), 1928

Gelatin silver print, mounted on cardstock

9 3/8 x 7 in. (23.8 x 17.8 cm)

Signed and dated verso: A. Feininger 1928

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

(Three Wooden Locomotives, Carved and Handpainted by Lyonel Feininger), 1928

Gelatin silver print, mounted on cardstock

6 5/8 x 9 1/4 in. (16.8 x 23.5 cm)

Signed and dated verso: A. Feininger 1928

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

(Wooden Sailing Ships and Figures, Carved and Handpainted by Lyonel Feininger), c. 1965

Gelatin silver print

9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (24.1 x 19.4 cm)

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Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956)
(Steam Locomotive), c. 1928
Gelatin silver print
4 9/16 x 5 13/16 in. (11.6 x 14.8 cm)

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)
(Wooden Locomotives and Tenders, Carved and Handpainted by Lyonel Feininger), c. 1928
Gelatin silver print

c. 9 1/2h x 7 1/2 in. (24.13 x 19.1 cm)

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

(Two Wooden Locomotives and A Figure, Carved and Handpainted by Lyonel Feininger), c. 1928

Gelatin silver print

6 5/8 x 9 1/4 in. (16.8 x 23.5 cm)

Signed verso: A. Feininger

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Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956)
(Andreas Feininger’s Opel Car), c. 1931
Gelatin silver print
7 x 9 3/8 in. (17.8 x 23.8 cm)

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Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956)
(Steam Train), c. 1928
Gelatin silver print
5 13/16 x 4 9/16 in. (14.8 x 11.6 cm)

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

(Wooden Locomotive and Figure, Carved and Handpainted by Lyonel Feininger), c. 1928

Gelatin silver print

7 3/4 x 7 3/4 in. (19.7 x 19.7 cm)

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

Lyonel Feininger Playing the Violin, 1951

Gelatin silver print

10 3/8 x 13 1/4 in. (26.4  33.7 cm)

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Andreas Feininger (1906–1999)

Spider Web, c. 1935 

Gelatin silver print

11 3/4 x 8 3/4 in. (29.8 x 22.2 cm)

Signed verso: A. Feininger

Inscribed and dated verso: Stockholm c. 1935

 

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Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956)
(Two Wooden Sailing Boats in Calm Sea), c. 1929
Gelatin silver print
7 x 9 1/8 in. (17.8 x 23.2 cm)

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A Family Passion - Viewing Room - Moeller Fine Art

Self-Portrait of Andreas Feininger, 1946

Andreas Feininger

"One of the world's most prolific photographers, Feininger was a pioneer both visually and technically. Born in Paris, son of the painter Lyonel Feininger, Andreas was educated in German public schools and at the Weimar Bauhaus. His interest in photography developed while he was studying architecture, and he worked as both architect and photographer in Germany for four years, until political circumstances made it impossible. He moved to Paris, where he worked in Le Corbusier's studio, and then to Stockholm. There he established his own photographic firm specializing in architectural and industrial photography. With the outbreak of war in 1939, Feininger moved to New York, where he was a freelance photographer for the Black Star Agency and then for the U.S. Office of War Information. After working on a retainer basis, he was a staff photographer at LIFE from 1943 to 1962, and there established his reputation. He subsequently concentrated on his personal work, exhibiting and publishing extensively. Feininger was renowned as a teacher via his publications that combine practical experience with clarity of presentation.

Feininger's purpose in photography was documentation of the unity of natural things, their interdependence, and their similarity to constructed forms. His images emphasize design, deploying the principles of simplicity, clarity, and organization. In addition to natural forms, Feininger's subject matter included the city, machines, and sculpture. He built four customized telephoto lenses and three close-up cameras, which allowed him to represent landscapes and city scenes in a distortion-free monumental perspective, and to show small subjects in startling sizes, thereby revealing unknown aspects. He preferred black-and-white photography for the graphic control it allowed. Feininger received numerous awards."

By Lisa Soccio, International Center of Photography, New York

A Family Passion - Viewing Room - Moeller Fine Art

Self-Portrait of T. Lux Feininger, 1939

T. Lux Feininger

"T. Lux Feininger was born in Berlin and spent his early years in Germany. He studied art at the Bauhaus School in Berlin under, among others, László Moholy Nagy and Oskar Schlemmer, yet he was unable to study photography there because it was not taught until 1929. Feininger learned it nevertheless, and in 1927 he went to work for the Berlin photo agency DEPHOT. Two years later he participated in the groundbreaking Film und Foto Stuttgart 1929 exhibition.  

Feininger began to paint in the early 1930s; after three years of living in Paris, he relocated to New York in 1937, leaving behind the majority of his negatives, which he never recovered. He did not make photographs again until after World War II and then only for his own use and enjoyment. After 1953 Feininger stopped making photographs altogether. He turned his full energies to painting and teaching, first in New York and later in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He retired from teaching in 1975, but he continues to paint and exhibit his work."

By J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

A Family Passion - Viewing Room - Moeller Fine Art

Lyonel Feininger Photographing at the Beach, 1927 

Photo by T. Lux Feininger

Lyonel Feininger

"When he first began experimenting with photography, the painter and graphic artist Lyonel Feininger (1871-1956) was 58 years old and had been a professor at the Bauhaus for almost a decade. Inspired by the works of his sons, Lux and Andreas, as well as the experimental photography of his Dessau neighbor László Moholy-Nagy, Feininger took up the camera in 1928 and began to explore a variety of avant-garde techniques. The painter of crystalline architecture and landscapes left a legacy of fascinating nighttime photographs, double exposures, negative prints, and unsettling images of shop window mannequins and reflections."

By Laura Muir, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, MA

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